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Jesus, Son Of God

And Jesus, when he was baptized, went up straightway out of the water: and lo, the heavens were opened unto him, and he saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove, and lighting upon him.

And lo a voice from heaven saying, This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased.

Matthew 3:16-17

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God should know the identity of his son. He gave the testimony that Jesus was His son.

He did not say, "This is a beloved part of myself, in whom I am well pleased."

He said it was His son in whom He was well pleased.

What did Jesus say of himself?

"Then came the Jews round about him, and said unto him, How long dost thou make us to doubt? If thou be the Christ, tell us plainly."

John 10:24

Unbelievers among the people of Israel, the Jews, asked Jesus to plainly say who he is, if he be the Christ, the anointed promise of God to Israel.

"Jesus answered them, I told you, and ye believed not: the works that I do in my Father's name, they bear witness of me.

"But ye believe not, because ye are not of my sheep, as I said unto you."

John 10:25-26

The problem these people had in understanding who Jesus was is that they simply refused to believe. Jesus had demonstrated the works of God, and he had spoken of who he was. They simply discounted what they saw with any possible alternative explanations.

"My sheep hear my voice, and I know them, and they follow me:

"And I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand.

"My Father, which gave them me, is greater than all; and no man is able to pluck them out of my Father's hand.

"I and my Father are one."

John 10:27-30

I and my Father are one. What does it mean?

Most look at this and say, "See? Jesus is God."

But Jesus also says we are one with them.

"Sanctify them through thy truth: thy word is truth.

"As thou hast sent me into the world, even so have I also sent them into the world.

"And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth.

"Neither pray I for these alone, but for them also which shall believe on me through their word;

"That they all may be one; as thou, Father, art in me, and I in thee, that they also may be one in us: that the world may believe that thou hast sent me.

"And the glory which thou gavest me I have given them; that they may be one, even as we are one:

"I in them, and thou in me, that they may be made perfect in one; and that the world may know that thou hast sent me, and hast loved them, as thou hast loved me"

John 17:17-23

Are you God? Am I? Yet, even as they are one, in the same way they are one, we can be one.

It is a figure of speech, an identification with.

Through the sanctification of the Word of God, Jesus is one with God, and we are one with God. We are one in purpose, one in standard.

"Then the Jews took up stones again to stone him.

"Jesus answered them, Many good works have I shewed you from my Father; for which of those works do ye stone me?

"The Jews answered him, saying, For a good work we stone thee not; but for blasphemy; and because that thou, being a man, makest thyself God."

John 10:31-33

The unbelievers among the Jews said, "Oh, you're making yourself God. You say you are one with God, you are therefore calling yourself God.

"Jesus answered them, Is it not written in your law, I said, Ye are gods?

"If he called them gods, unto whom the word of God came, and the scripture cannot be broken;

"Say ye of him, whom the Father hath sanctified, and sent into the world, Thou blasphemest; because I said, I am the Son of God?

John 10:24-36

Jesus said that God had called those of Israel gods, "Elohim." If they called themselves "Elohim" without sin, how much less would it be a sin for the son of God to say he was merely the son?

"Say ye of him. "thou blasphemeth," because I said, I am the Son of God?"

Jesus was not saying he was God, he was saying he was the son of God. The unbelievers merely took it to mean Jesus was elevating himself to the same position as his Father.

Jesus was saying he was the Son of God.

A son is progeny.

A son is an offspring.

A son has a beginning.

This is the testimony of God regarding Jesus Christ.

Did Jesus have a beginning? Did he have an origin? And was this origin the same as his initial appearance on earth, born in Bethlehem?

Matthew 1:1 reads:

"The book of the generation of Jesus Christ, the son of David, the son of Abraham."

"Generation" we think of as the children of the fathers and mothers of the previous generation, who in turn were the generation of the children of the generation prior to them.

But in Matthew, the term "generation" is from the Greek "geneseos," meaning "beginning," and "origin." Same as the meaning of the book Genesis.

Matthew says that it is the book of the origin, the literal beginning, of Jesus Christ, and that beginning is "conceived by the Holy Ghost."

"But while he thought on these things, behold, the angel of the LORD appeared unto him in a dream, saying, Joseph, thou son of David, fear not to take unto thee Mary thy wife: for that which is conceived in her is of the Holy Ghost."

Matthew 1:20

This was the origin, the beginning, of Jesus.

Why then is it said he came from heaven?

Because though beginning on earth, the conception of Jesus was through the power of the God of Heaven

"John bare witness of him, and cried, saying, This was he of whom I spake, He that cometh after me is preferred before me: for he was before me.

"And of his fulness have all we received, and grace for grace.

"For the law was given by Moses, but grace and truth came by Jesus Christ.

"No man hath seen God at any time, the only begotten Son, which is in the bosom of the Father, he hath declared him."

John 1:15-18

Jesus was preferred "before" John. The word "before" is "emprosthen," and refers to position or rank, not time.

Jesus was preferred "before" John in rank because he was chosen before him in rank.

"He was before me" therefore refers to his important calling, as it is written:

"But with the precious blood of Christ, as of a lamb without blemish and without spot:

"Who verily was foreordained before the foundation of the world, but was manifest in these last times for you,

"Who by him do believe in God, that raised him up from the dead, and gave him glory; that your faith and hope might be in God."

I Peter 1:19-21

Jesus was "foreordained." This translation makes it seem like he was standing around and God put the laurel on his head, saying, "Thus shall be done with you."

But the word "foreordain" is actually "proegnoskomenon," which literally means "to know before the fact." How could Jesus be known before his existance if he already existed? Note this refers not to the acts of Jesus being foreknown, but Jesus himself!

God knew of Jesus before his actual existance. And so, Jesus was "preferred before" John in rank, to what end?

That the son might declare the Father, for no man had seen God at any time, but the son declared Him.

Did people see God?

No.

Did people see Jesus?

Yes.

Therefore, was Jesus God, or did he merely declare God?

He was the Father's son. And he is still the Father's son, and as the son, he declares the Father.

And as a son, he had a beginning, an origin, as revealed by Matthew 1:1.

The other gospels concur.

"The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God;"

Mark 1:1

The beginning of the good news of Jesus wasn't in heaven, where as part of God he volunteered to show himself to man. It was with John wherein Mark tells us,

"The beginning of the gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God;

"As it is written in the prophets, Behold, I send my messenger before thy face, which shall prepare thy way before thee.

"The voice of one crying in the wilderness, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straight."

Mark 1:1-3

John's ministry to prepare the way of one coming after him was the beginning of the gospel of Jesus.

"Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us,

"Even as they delivered them unto us, which from the beginning were eyewitnesses, and ministers of the word;

"It seemed good to me also, having had perfect understanding of all things from the very first, to write unto thee in order, most excellent Theophilus,

"That thou mightest know the certainty of those things, wherein thou hast been instructed."

Luke 1:1-4

Luke had "perfect," or "devine," understanding. How? From above, from revelation. After all, the scriptures come from above.

And he wrote the gospel of Luke so that believers might be certain in what they believe.

Did Jesus have an origin?

Did his life begin in Israel, with his conception and birth?

Can we be certain?

The chronicle of the Book of Acts, written by Luke after he recorded the gospel, reveals this:

"The former treatise have I made, O Theophilus, of all that Jesus began both to do and teach,

"Until the day in which he was taken up, after that he through the Holy Ghost had given commandments unto the apostles whom he had chosen:"

Acts 1:1-2

In Acts, Luke reveals that his first account was of all Jesus began to do and teach.

Does the Gospel record of Luke reveal a pre-birth Christ, planning out things with God? Does it reveal planning and creating things as his first works?

No. It records his birth and his earthly ministry, for this was the origin, the beginning, of Jesus Christ, and thus of his gospel.

Certain Scriptures may indicate a previous incarnation of Jesus, and as such, appear to contradict the literal sonship, the literal origin of Jesus from the womb of Mary.

Careful study, however, always reveals a complementary truth.

For example, Jesus says, again to unbelievers among the Jews, regarding his Father:

"Jesus answered, If I honour myself, my honour is nothing: it is my Father that honoureth me; of whom ye say, that he is your God:

"Yet ye have not known him; but I know him: and if I should say, I know him not, I shall be a liar like unto you: but I know him, and keep his saying.

"Your father Abraham rejoiced to see my day: and he saw it, and was glad.

"Then said the Jews unto him, Thou art not yet fifty years old, and hast thou seen Abraham?"

John 8:54-57

They misconstrued Jesus' words again, saying he had seen Abraham.

But Jesus merely said Abraham had seen his day. Literally? No. For, the day of the Lord, the day of the vengeance of God, is yet to come and had not even come to pass in Jesus' time.

But through revelation Abraham knew of a promised seed, a redeemer, and was glad.

"Jesus said unto them, Verily, verily, I say unto you, Before Abraham was, I am."

John 8:58

People still misconstrue Jesus' words through unbelief.

They say, "see, before Abraham was, I was."

But Jesus did not say, "Before Abraham was, I was."

He said, "Before Abraham was, I am."

Is there a difference?

Of course. "Before Abraham was I was" means Jesus already existed at the time of Abraham.

But the Word does not say, "before Abraham was, I was."

"Before Abraham was, I am" means that the eventual existance of Jesus, at the very time he spoke those words, was inevitable. Why?

Because he was foreknown: he was known in the foreknowledge of God, who ordained Jesus to glory before Jesus actually existed.

John also agrees with the previous records.

"And the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father,) full of grace and truth."

John 1:14

The Word that was made flesh was Jesus Christ.

There is no grammatical indication that the Word made flesh was the Word that was with God and was God.

Consider the Word a blueprint, and the blueprint is so much a part of the mind of it's creator that it is identified with him.

When the blueprint is conceived, made, brought to pass, the resulting creation is its own entity, it has independent existance.

The Word made flesh was the fruition of the blueprint: a man made in the image of God.

Thus John also agrees with the other gospels.

"Jesus saith unto him, Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.

"And many other signs truly did Jesus in the presence of his disciples, which are not written in this book:

"But these are written, that ye might believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God; and that believing ye might have life through his name."

John 20:29-31

Not that we might believe Jesus is God, but that he is the son of God.

Those who would warp this Gospel of John to prove Jesus is not the literal son of God go directly contrary to its avowed purpose!

Jesus had a literal origin, and he is literally the son of God. And when we believe on that, we find life in his name.

There are some Scriptures that appear to contradict all of the Scriptures revealing the origin of Jesus. We will not deal here with all of them, only the two most glaring.

Either Jesus' works began as recorded in the Gospels, or they occurred as it appears in Ephesians and Colossians, with creation.

These two references appear to contradict the gospel records and throw the entire subject into the realm of man's opinion as to which to believe.

I prefer to adhere to the majority testimony of Scripture, which clearly describes the origin of Christ.

A better way is to find out as close as possible whether the two main contradictory accounts are accurately transcribed and translated.

"And to make all men see what is the fellowship of the mystery, which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God, who created all things by Jesus Christ:"

Ephesians 3:9

Now, in contradiction to everything we have seen, we have Jesus at the creation of the world, making everything with God.

What a serious oversight on the part of Luke, who, with devine understanding, thought all Jesus began both to do and to teach began with his earthly ministry!

But in comparing textual references, we find that out of the nine major Greek textual compilations, only Stephen's text includes the words "by Jesus Christ."

The other, many of them older versions (Stephen's was compiled in the 1600's) read:

"And to make all men see what is the fellowship of the mystery, which from the beginning of the world hath been hid in God, who created all things."

Ephesians 3:9

For it was God Who created all things.

There is one more glaring contradiction to this truth.

"Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light:

"Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:

"In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of sins:

"Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature:

"For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:

"And he is before all things, and by him all things consist.

"And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.

"For it pleased the Father that in him should all fulness dwell;"

Colossians 1:12-19

Everything we have seen in all of those other accounts now appears contradicted.

Jesus was there with his Father, if not a part of God than at least co-eternal with him.

But those who canonised Scripture in the third century wanted us to know one thing first: Jesus had an origin, and it was on such a fashion.

That was the first truth God revealed through Matthew.

What is wrong? Why do these not fit together?

Let us take a closer look at this section.

"Giving thanks unto the Father, which hath made us meet to be partakers of the inheritance of the saints in light:

"Who hath delivered us from the power of darkness, and hath translated us into the kingdom of his dear Son:"

Colossians 1:12-13

We see first that the context of this section is the inheritance of the saints, and the kingdom of who? The son of God.

Both of these aspects are future: neither has been established, not our inheritance, not the kingdom of Jesus which will be established after Tribulations of Revelations.

"In whom we have redemption through his blood, even the forgiveness of sins:

"Who is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn of every creature:"

Colossians 1:14-15

Jesus is the firstborn of every creature. What "creatures" does this refer to? Dogs? Cats? Bugs?

The term "creature" is "ktiseos," and "firstborn" is "prototikos."

"Prototikos" refers to the prototype of a series, from which all others are copied from.

"Ktiseos" refers to the establishment of a political unit.

What type? What political unit?

The inheritance of the saints, and the kingdom of Jesus.

In this inheritance, and in this Kingdom, he is the type from which all are compared to and copied from!.

"For by him were all things created, that are in heaven, and that are in earth, visible and invisible, whether they be thrones, or dominions, or principalities, or powers: all things were created by him, and for him:

"And he is before all things, and by him all things consist."

Colossians 1:16-17

"Created" is again "ektisthe," of which Vine reveals was used in secular literature, of the founding of a city.

Translators, continuing tradition, assumed "ktiste" and its forms equated to the Hebrew "bara," which is used to describe God's creation of all things.

It is not. "Poema" is the closest Greek equivalent to "bara."

"Ktiste" is a political term. Every verse it is used in makes more sense when one understands this.

"Submit yourselves to every ordinance of man for the Lord's sake: whether it be to the king, as supreme;

"Or unto governors, as unto them that are sent by him for the punishment of evildoers, and for the praise of them that do well.

"For so is the will of God, that with well doing ye may put to silence the ignorance of foolish men:

"As free, and not using your liberty for a cloke of maliciousness, but as the servants of God."

I Peter 2:13-16

"Ordinance" is again a form of "ktisis."

We are to submit to the order, the political structuring, of man. Not to his "creations," "bara" or "poema," but to his political systems, his "ktiseos.".

And in Colossians, we are dealing not with the "bara" of all existance, but the "ktisis," the ordering, of the inheritance and of the kingdom of Jesus Christ.

In this kingdom, which though established has not yet descended to earth, all political things, whether in heaven or earth, all thrones, dominions, principalities or powers (notice it doesn't say all cats or dogs) are "ktisis," ordered and established, by Jesus.

All things pertaining to this inheritance and this kingdom are ordered, founded, through him ("by" is "di," and means "through") and for him, and through him all things pertaining to the politics of this inheritance and this kingdom consist.

"And he is the head of the body, the church: who is the beginning, the firstborn from the dead; that in all things he might have the preeminence.

"For it pleased the Father that in him should all fulness dwell;"

Colossians 1:18-19

In Jesus all fulness dwells: God set him preeminent in this coming Kingdom: the positioning, the order, of the inheritance of the saints depends on Jesus Christ.

This section does not contradict all the others after all.

Jesus is literally the son of God, with an origin, and he is our Lord, on whose grace we depend for our position in his kingdom.

Yesterday, today, and forever,

Jesus,

the Son of God.

(Vine's Expository Dictionary, Royal Publishers, Nashville, 1952, was our primary source of definitions for this study. We also referred to Young's Analytical Concordance, Eerdman's, Grand Rapids, 1982, and Berry's Interlinear, Regency, Grand Rapids, 1990.

Scripture was pasted from The Bible Gateway, KJV.)

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